A Rose for Emily

954
506

When she opened the package at home william faulkner a rose for emily was written on the box, under the skull and bones: She died in one of the downstairs rooms, in a heavy walnut bed with a curtain, her gray head propped on a pillow yellow and moldy with age and lack of sunlight. At first we were glad that Miss Emily would have an interest, because the ladies all said, "Of course a Grierson would not think seriously of a Northerner, a day laborer.

A Rose For Emily by William Faulkner

The story is presented to the reader in a non-chronological order; this suggests that the story is being patched together by multiple people. A deputation waited upon her, knocked at the door through which no visitor had passed since she ceased giving china-painting lessons eight or ten years earlier. There seems to be some type of dispute between Emily and the cousins, indicated by them living far away from Emily and the fact that they did not go to Emily's father's funeral. Two days later we learned that she had bought a complete outfit of men's clothing, including a nightshirt, and we said, "They are married. Instead, they decide to send men to her house under the cover of darkness to sprinkle lime around the house, after which the smell dissipates.

John Skinner states that Faulkner should be taken literally, appreciate his formal subtlety in his works. The next Sunday they again drove about the streets, and the following day the minister's wife wrote to Miss Emily's relations in Alabama. So the next night, after midnight, four men crossed Miss Emily's lawn and slunk about the house like burglars, sniffing along the base of the brickwork and at the cellar openings while one of them performed a regular sowing motion with his hand out of a sack slung from his shoulder. When the town got free postal delivery, Miss Emily alone refused to let them fasten the metal numbers above her door and attach a mailbox to it. Had the story been told in a linear fashion, this understanding would have been lost, something Faulkner knew and incorporated into the story. Emily is alone, yet always being watched by the townspeople; she is both apart from and a part of the community. And now Miss Emily had gone to join the representatives of those august names where they lay in the cedar-bemused cemetery among the ranked and anonymous graves of Union and Confederate soldiers who fell at the battle of Jefferson. She was over thirty then, still a slight woman, though thinner than usual, with cold, haughty black eyes in a face the flesh of which was strained across the temples and about the eyesockets as you imagine a lighthouse-keeper's face ought to look. There are impersonal forces of nature that prevent him or her from taking control. Emily continuing to sleep next to Homer's body can be seen as the south holding on to an ideal that is no longer feasible.

Some parts of the story are repeated, such as Homer's disappearance, the idea that Emily and Homer will get married, and Emily's refusal to pay taxes, also indicating that the narrator is a voice for the town. She refuses to william faulkner a rose for emily up his corpse, and the townspeople write it off as her grieving process. Although Emily did not have a strong relationship with her community, she did give art lessons to young children within her town. Emily's tragedy is her environment, changing quickly and with volatility, causing her to cling to the past in hopes of stopping the change from occurring. This, along with the fact that he is seemingly courting Emily, sets him apart from all of the other characters in the story. During the next few years it grew grayer and william faulkner a rose for emily until it attained an even pepper-and-salt iron-gray, when it ceased turning. When she opened the package at home there was written on the box, under the skull and bones: John Skinner states that Faulkner should be taken literally, appreciate his formal subtlety in his works. The death of Homer, if interpreted as having been a murder, can be seen in the context of the North-South clash. The reason for Sartoris remitting her taxes is never given, only that he told Emily it was because her father loaned the money to the town.

The body had apparently once lain in the attitude of an embrace, but now the long sleep that outlasts love, that conquers even the grimace of love, had cuckolded him. At first we were glad that Miss Emily would have an interest, because the ladies all said, "Of course a Grierson would not think seriously of a Northerner, a day laborer. Now and then we would see her in one of the downstairs windows--she had evidently shut up the top floor of the house--like the carven torso of an idol in a niche, looking or not looking at us, we could never tell which.

And that was the last we saw of Homer Barron. Being left alone, and a pauper, she had become humanized. Emily falls victim to the ruling hand of her father and to her place in the society: We are the city authorities, Miss Emily.

A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner (Summary) - Minute Book Report

And so she died. That was when people had begun to feel really sorry for her. When it comes to death itself, Emily is in denial and most of that feeling has to do with her loneliness.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here